Forensic Stories, Medico-legal context and Life


Neuroscience and Applied Neuroanthropology
June 9, 2012, 8:02 am
Filed under: Forensics

https://www.google.com/reader/i/#stream/feed%2Fhttp%3A%2F%2Fblogs.plos.org%2Fneuroanthropology%2Ffeed%2F

The combination of a structured environment (the study), a specific activity (exercise or memory recall), and targeted techniques (extinction training) is one that makes sense to me for a broad range of neuroanthropology-inspired approaches to intervention. I’d also add that the intention and interpretation that participants bring to what they do also matters. In the case of exercise, it is more than just physiological arousal leading to neural plasticity; there is a strong case for the joy and framing of exercise to make a difference in the effects achieved.

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9 June, 2012 07:53
June 9, 2012, 7:53 am
Filed under: Forensics

http://www.technologyreview.com/view/428134/the-future-of-medical-visualisation/



With no paper trail, can science determine age? – science-in-society – 11 May 2012 – New Scientist
June 6, 2012, 11:38 pm
Filed under: Anthropology, Bones, DNA

With no paper trail, can science determine age? – science-in-society – 11 May 2012 – New Scientist.



The ‘CSI Effect’: Does It Really Exist? | National Institute of Justice
June 4, 2012, 5:50 am
Filed under: Forensics

The ‘CSI Effect’: Does It Really Exist?

by Honorable Donald E. Shelton

Crime and courtroom proceedings have long been fodder for film and television scriptwriters. In recent years, however, the media’s use of the courtroom as a vehicle for drama has not only proliferated, it has changed focus. In apparent fascination with our criminal justice process, many of today’s courtroom dramas are based on actual cases. Court TV offers live gavel-to-gavel coverage of trials over the Internet for $5.95 a month. Now, that’s “reality television”!

via The ‘CSI Effect’: Does It Really Exist? | National Institute of Justice.



The Difference Between Scientific Evidence And The Scientific Method | Litigation
June 4, 2012, 5:49 am
Filed under: Forensics

Scientific evidence is one of those rare areas of law upon which every lawyer agrees: we are all certain that everyone else is wrong.

 

Defense lawyers think judges too easily allow in “junk science” from plaintiffs, citing the silicon breast implant litigation, which resulted in over $3 billion in settlements and compensation for autoimmune injuries that most scientists now agree weren’t caused by the implants. Plaintiff’s lawyers, in turn, think the silicon implant case is the exception that proves the rule, and that courts these days more frequently use Daubert and Frye to destroy plaintiffs’ cases by wrongly excluding from trial valid scientific and medical testimony (here’s an example involving vinyl chloride and cancer, and another involving Tylenol and liver damage, and don’t forget Kumho Tire’s indefensible exclusion of an eminently qualified tire tread separation expert), while allowing defendants to bring in all kinds of unscientific nonsense (like the natural forces nonsense in shoulder dystocia lawsuits that’s allowed everywhere except New York).

(In the criminal context, prosecutors complain about the “CSI Effect,” the claim that jurors today expect forensic evidence in every case, while criminal defense lawyers counter that the forensic evidence offered is often garbage and speculation from people with a diploma mill degree.)

 

via The Difference Between Scientific Evidence And The Scientific Method | Litigation.



Essex Police roll out scanner that can make 360° view of crime scene and play it back in 3D | Mail Online
June 4, 2012, 5:39 am
Filed under: Forensics

Essex Police roll out scanner that can make 360° view of crime scene and play it back in 3D

Scanner can reduce police time at the scene by 50% – especially useful in the aftermath of motorway accidents

25 forces plan to roll out technology over next few years

Evidence can be used in courtrooms

via Essex Police roll out scanner that can make 360° view of crime scene and play it back in 3D | Mail Online.



With no paper trail, can science determine age? – science-in-society – 11 May 2012 – New Scientist
June 4, 2012, 5:38 am
Filed under: Forensics

GUESSING someone’s age can be risky at cocktail parties, but what about when their future is at stake? For refugees, the difference between childhood and adulthood can be the difference between asylum, deportation or jail.

Thanks to international child protection laws, asylum-seekers are more likely to be admitted to wealthy nations if they are under 18. Minors get access to many social programmes and as such they can be costly to governments, so officials want to be confident on the age issue. When documents are in question – or do not exist – immigration departments look to science.

via With no paper trail, can science determine age? – science-in-society – 11 May 2012 – New Scientist.